Dream Dictionary

Dreams dictionary with thousands of dreams arranged alphabetically

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This section on dreams has a complete dream dictionary with dream interpretation and dream analysis. More than one thousand dreams are listed alphabetically in this dream dictionary with dreams meaning for the convenience of readers.

Introduction to dreams

The mind loses its reason or will in sleep, but a super-sensitive perception is awakened, and, as it regains consciousness from sleep, the sound of a knock on the wall may be magnified into a pistol shot. The sleeping mind is not only super-sensitive as to existing external sounds and light, but it frequently sees hours and days ahead of the waking mind. Nor is this contradictory to the laws of nature.

The ant housed in the depth of the earth, away from atmospheric changes, knows of the approach of the harvest, and comes forth to lay by his store. In a like manner, the pet squirrel is a better barometer of the local weather than the Weather Bureau. With unerring foresight, when a wintry frown nowhere mars the horizon, he is able to apprehend a cold wave twenty-four hours ahead, and build his house accordingly.

So in sleep, man dreams the future by intuitive perception of invisible signs or influences, while awake he reasons it out by cause and effect. The former seems to be the law of the spiritual world, while the latter would appear to be the law of the material world. Man should not depend alone upon either. Together they proclaim the male and female principle of existence and should find harmonious consummation. In this manner only can man hope to achieve that perfect normal state to which the best thought of the human race is aspiring, where he can create and control influences instead of being created and controlled by them, as the majority of us are at the present day.

God, the highest subjective source of intelligence, may in a dream leave impressions or presentiments on the mind of man, the highest objective source of intelligence. The physical sun sends its light into the dark corners of the earth, and God, the Spiritual Sun, imparts spiritual light into the passive and receptive soul.

Man, by hiding in a cave, or closing the windows and doors of his house, may shut out all physical light; so he may steep his soul in sensual debauchery until all spiritual light is shut out. Just as the vital essence of the soil, the mother of nature, may be extracted by abuse, either from omission or commission, until neither the light of the sun, nor the moisture of the heavens will wake the flush of life, so may the spiritual essence be deadened when the soil of the soul is filled with the aged and multiplying weeds of ravishing materiality.

The dream mind is often influenced by the waking mind. When the waking mind dwells upon any subject, the dream mind is more or less influenced by it, and it often assists the waking mind in solving difficult problems. The personal future, embodied in the active states of the universal mind, may affect the dream mind, producing premonitions of death, accidents and misfortune.

The objective mind rejoices or laments over the aspects of the past and present, while the spiritual mind, striving with the personal future, either laments or rejoices over the prospective conditions. One is the barometer of the past, while the other is the barometer of the future.

If we study carefully the spiritual impressions left upon the dream mind, through the interpretations we will be able to shape our future in accordance with spiritual law. Thus our temporal events will contribute to our spiritual development, and in turn our spiritual knowledge will contribute to our temporal welfare. Without this harmonious interaction of the two great forces in man, the Divine plan of destiny cannot be reached.

This can only be accomplished through the material mind or reason dominating the animal emotions of the heart. In this way we would not covet our neighbor’s goods, or grow angry with our brother over trifles. The theory used in this book to interpret dreams is both simple and rational. By the using of it you will be surprised to find so many of the predictions fulfilled in your waking life. We deal with both the thought and the dream.

The thought or sign implied in the object dreamed of and the influence surrounding it are always considered in the interpretation. Thoughts proceed from the visible mind and dreams from the invisible mind. The average waking mind receives and retains only a few of the lessons of life. It is largely filled with idle and incoherent thoughts that are soon forgotten.

The same may be truly said of the dream mind. Many of our day thoughts are daydreams, just as many of our night dreams are night thoughts. Our day deeds of evil or good pierce or soothe the conscience, just as our night symbols of sorrow and joy sadden or please the objective senses. Our day’s thoughts are filled with the warnings and presence of the inner mind and our night’s thoughts are tinctured and often controlled by our external mind.

What this topic is all about

We do not claim that this topic will prove an interpreter of all dreams, or that the keys disclosed will open to you all the mysteries of the future, or even all those surrounding your own personality, but by studying the definitions and the plane upon which they were written, you will be able, through the power of your own spirit, to interpret your own dreams.

The combination of dream and dream influences are as infinite as the stars, or the combination of thought and number. They can only be classed and considered as such. They cannot be analyzed in detail or as a whole. In mathematics we have nine digits from which an infinite variety of combinations may be formed and solved by the deduction of the mind. Through them we may measure time, space, quality and quantity.

A wise doctor, in preparing medicine for a patient, considers well his age, temperament and his present condition. So should the interpreter of dreams ponder well the mental state, the health, habits and temperament of the dreamer. These things no one can know so well as the dreamer himself. He, therefore, with the aid of these articles, will be able to interpret his dreams by the light that is in him.

Nature, in compounding the materials for the creation of the deaf man, inadvertently dropped the ingredient sound, hence making an imperfect being; and sound, being thus foreign to his nature, he can only be approached by signs even in dreams. Subjectivity uses nature’s forces, while a normal person uses dreams to work on his waking consciousness. As it is impossible to use with effect a factor which a man does not naturally possess, a deaf man rarely ever dreams of sound, or a blind man of light.

The articles in this topic dreams are taken from the book Ten thousand dreams interpreted, or, what’s in a dream a scientific and practical exposition by Gustavus Hindman Miller. The copy has been kept in its original form as supplied in etext form courtesy of Project Gutenberg, apart from style and hypertext link alterations to make the navigation process easier.

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